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  • Adaptation Displacement: The success of the series meant that the Teen Titans are Robin (specifically, Dick Grayson), Cyborg, Starfire, Beast Boy and Raven as far as most of the public is concerned. The comics have been around since the 1960s and have had dozens of members throughout the years, but good luck finding many people who recognize any outside the core five from the TV show. Most subsequent adaptations try to mimic this show's roster as a result, only swapping out a character or two.
  • Adaptation Distillation: Adapts and distills many elements from the Wolfman and Perez age of the comics, along with some elements from both before and after that period.
  • And the Fandom Rejoiced: This video for the DC Nation block of Cartoon Network shows scenes of chibi version of the The Titans. Extra rejoicing as it's in the same style of the show and has the same voices.
    • And what's better? It's becoming an actual show.
    • Ultimately subverted when it ended up becoming the much-reviled Teen Titans Go.
  • Angst? What Angst?:
    • It's revealed in the tie-in comic that Starfire's parents died after she was sent away as a slave by Blackfire to the Gordanians. This isn't brought up at all in the episode where she returned to Tamaran. Granted, the comic came out after the episode aired, but watching it again, it becomes particularly jarring considering that Starfire displays no form of grief. Blackfire's lack of grief is justified, though.
    • Beast Boy has several examples:
      • During "The Beast Within", Robin decides to subject Beast Boy to a full-blown police interrogation to figure out what happened to Raven after they disappeared from the tower. Nobody ever brings up how the Titans were one hundred percent willing to assume the worst of him, or how Beast Boy's episode is a blatant example of There Are No Therapists.
      • Also from "The Beast Within", Cyborg suggests that Beast Boy's DNA is decomposing, which is a condition that almost assuredly means death... but not only is the implication ignored by everyone in the room, literally the first thing that comes out of Beast Boy's mouth is a question about Raven's recovery.
      • Beast Boy's history with Terra is one of the most heartbreaking things to happen to the team, and yet he only ever angsts about it when she's relevant to the plot. The rest of the time, there's practically no sign that she had any impact at all.
      • Everything to do with the Doom Patrol, who were introduced in Season Five and introduced a huge retcon into Beast Boy's history — Beast Boy had always been rather free-floating as the show's resident Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass, so the idea that he's actually been a Military Brat who would rather save lives than follow orders the whole time is downright bizarre. Even Cyborg and Raven privately muse about it.
      • The tie-in comic also confirms that Garfield's parents died in Africa when he was a little boy. This gets even less treatment than the matter of the Doom Patrol.
  • Awesome Music:
    • Mumbo's "Master of Your Fate". It's also an Ear Worm.
    • Terra's theme.
    • Everything from the "Aftershock" and "The End" multi-parters.
    • Here's one that doubles as a Crowning Moment of Funny: "When there's trouble you know what to dooooo... CALL CYBORG! He can shoot a rocket from his shooooe... CAUSE HE'S CYBORG! Nananana, something like that! Doodadoodah, BIG FLUFFY CAT!" (That's right!)
    • The third act of "Masks" has some of the most ominous background music in the show. Special mention goes to Slade's first full appearance, and then his first real fight with Robin.
    • The climax of the episode Haunted is perfectly spine-chilling.
    • Blink and you'll miss it, but when the Titans make a comeback during the big fight with the Brotherhood of Evil in the Grand Finale Titans Together, a badass remix of the main theme song plays, slower-paced and instrumental-only.
    • The song "Raining Down on the Fourth of July Parade" in the episode "Revolution".
  • Base Breaker: Terra, chiefly due to the Misaimed Fandom.
  • Bizarro Episode: At least once per season, with such episodes being telegraphed by use of the Japanese opening. Mad Mod's episodes fall into this, as do "Fractured" in Season 2, "Bunny Raven" in Season 3, "Don't Touch That Dial", "Employee of the Month" and "Mother Mae-Eye" in Season 4, and "Revved Up" in Season 5.
  • Can't Unhear It:
    • After this show, there's a very good chance you'll be imagining Khary Payton as Cyborg, Tara Strong as Raven, Greg Cipes as Beast Boy, Scott Menville as Robin and Hynden Walch as Starfire when you read the comics. The same goes for Ron Perlman as Slade.
    • Particularly Khary Payton as Cyborg, having reprised the role in several other media after this series and seems to have become the de facto voice.
  • Captain Obvious: In "Trust", it's pretty obvious that Madame Rouge had disguised herself as Hot Spot in the end, due to how "he" conveniently appeared without having his powers activated.
  • Copy Cat Sue: There are increasing numbers of Terra/Raven clones in fanfiction.
  • Crack Pairing: In-universe, we have the Official Couple of Kid Flash/Jinx. While both characters are adapted from the comics, their ship isn't, and it's extremely unlikely to ever happen there. Cyborg even remarks on how weird it is that they've hooked up.
  • Creepy Awesome: Raven and Slade. Raven gets less creepy as the show goes on (not least because she's supposed to be one of the heroes of this show), but Slade gets more creepy as the show goes on.
  • Critical Dissonance: Season 5 was one of the most, if not the most, well-received season among critics and fans of the comics, who felt its tighter continuity, introduction of new characters such as Kid Flash and more serious tone made it just as good, if not better, than the previous season. Among fans of the show, it's the most polarizing season for some of the same reasons.
  • Crossover Ship:
    • It's not uncommon to find Teen Titans crossover pairings, especially ones with Raven. Some the most popular Teen Titans crossovers are Terra/Ben Tennyson, Raven/Danny Phantom, Raven/Prince Zuko, Raven/Ben Tennyson, Megara/Speedy.
      • The Ben 10 and Raven ones are especially strange when you consider that the original, young Ben was also voiced by Tara Strong, the voice of Raven.
      • Considering the Relationship Writing Fumble on the latter series, Terra and Ben 10 is also kinda weird, since Gwen in Ben 10: Alien Force was voiced by Ashley Johnson, who voiced Terra.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: In the third season episode "The Beast Within", it's hard to side with almost any of the Titans when they've all grabbed the Jerkass Ball and their actions only worsen the episode's situation.
  • Die for Our Ship:
    • Terra is not hated for her betrayal as much as she is hated for getting in between Beast Boy/Raven, even though Word of God states that there was nothing there but a close friendship.
    • Also, Robin/Raven fans towards Starfire.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?: The episode "The Beast Within" seems to resemble a PSA about steroid abuse, especially in the scenes with Beast Boy going into an animalistic rage in the gym. However, it has nothing to do with steroids whatsoever.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Slade.
  • Ear Worm: K2G from "Mad Mod".
  • Ending Aversion: The last episode, "Things Change", is generally seen as a disappointing finale. This is because half of it is spent on Padding as four of the Titans fight a random shape-shifting monster, while the main plot involving Beast Boy investigating Terra's revival raises several questions only to ultimately leave all of them unanswered.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Blackfire, Larry, Más Y Menos, Kid Flash and Malchior are extremely popular with fans, despite their limited appearances.
    • With Red X's considerable fanbase being especially impressive, considering we never learn anything of his background, nor even his identity or real face. He's a character original to the animated series, and he only appears in two episodes, in only one of which is he a headlining villain.
    • Jinx is incredibly popular for being the only competent member of the H.I.V.E. Five - so, perhaps unsurprisingly, her Heel Face Turn in "Lightspeed" was very well-received.
    • Argent only appears for a brief amount of time, but has a lot of fans.
    • Mumbo was supposed to be a one-off character created for the show, but a positive fan reaction influenced further appearance. Being voiced by Tom Kenny probably helped.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Slade. He's a detestable person, but so awesome at being bad that it gets him a big fanbase.
    • This series actually managed to turn Killer Moth into a badass Evil Genius. He creates an army of moths that nearly has him ruling the world, and fights the Teen Titans without the need of any effort. Even his costume is cool.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Blackfire and Madame Rouge.
    • Some found Terra to be sexy when she turned evil. Heck, even Slade has a reasonably large fangirl following, too!
  • Fan Dumb:
    • A number of viewers insisted (and still insist) that Slade is in fact Batman and everything he did was merely to train Robin into becoming his own man. Even ignoring how largely out-of-character it would be for Batman to try to murder the Titans, beat Robin to the point of abuse and make a Deal with the Devil, Slade is actually Slade Wilson, AKA Deathstroke, a villain from the original comics.
    • Out of character for most Batmen, yes. Not so much for The GODDAMN Batman (also known as "Crazy Steve"). In any case, there was some teasing that it might have been Batman in the earlier episodes, despite how little sense that would make.
    • Many fans of the show have never even heard of the Teen Titans before, and had no clue that the cartoon was based on a comic book with nearly forty years of continuity behind it. This lead to many fans to make remarkably ignorant statements regarding the writers of the comic book "stealing" ideas from the cartoon...
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
  • Follow the Leader: Try to find an American kids' action cartoon made in the past few years that does not take any cues from this series' success. It's not easy. Teen Titans solidified the trend of Animesque action-comedy kids' shows that run on Rule of Cool.
  • Fridge Brilliance: When Raven is not actively controlling her powers, they almost immediately become destructive. None of the other characters' powers really behave this way, suggesting that her abilities' default purpose is to obliterate everything in the general vicinity. This makes perfect sense... considering that her father is essentially DC Comics' version of the Devil.
  • Funny Aneurysm Moment:
    • Robin to Mother Mae-Eye: "Lady, you are not my mother."[1]
      • All of Raven's scenes in that episode. This is the only time she has ever had any parental figure who mothers her at all.
    • Also, the use of Dr. Light in the series, if you know the things he did elsewhere...
      • Also counts as a Continuity Nod, because in Identity Crisis, they partially damaged his brain during the mind wipe, making him even weaker than he originally was.
    • Raven's Mind Rape of Dr. Light in "Birthmark" being Played for Laughs becomes this in light of Slade mind raping her at the end of the episode.
  • Genius Bonus:
    • In "Haunted", when Raven goes through Robin's memories, the very last one is a circus, with two shadows on the wall falling downwards. Should give you a hint as to which Robin he is.
    • Also when Larry shows up, he gives his real name. It's backwards, but when the marquee wraps around behind him, we see it frontways.
  • Growing the Beard: For most, during late into the first season with the episode "Masks".
    • "Nevermore" departed from the standard fare superhero/supervillain conflicts of superhero shows by focusing on the dynamics between three characters trying to find common ground, even though their personalities were in conflict. This would be a running theme throughout the series, producing fan-favorite episodes such as "Fear Itself" and "How Long is Forever?", with a contrast expressed in the Origins Episode "Go!", showing how far the team's relationship has evolved in contrast to when they first met.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • In "Troq", Cyborg said he knew what it was like to experience prejudice, since he was a robot. Some fans said this was a cop-out when he's also black. But when we see "Go!", the Origins Episode, he clearly expects to be hated just because he's a cyborg freak, usually hides his identity as one and is surprised when Beast Boy actually thinks he's cool. And when you consider that most of the robots we see actually are evil, and that him being viewed as a freak for being a cyborg was a theme in the comics, it actually makes sense.
    • In "How Long is Forever?", Cyborg says that Starfire's friends "aren't friends anymore", and the villain of the episode, Warp, says that history cannot be changed, so Starfire's friends would still drift apart. Fast forward to Teen Titans Go!, and the way the Titans act can give off the feeling that they aren't friends in the slightest.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight:
    • In "Sisters", Starfire asks if the fireworks at the fair mean that the Gordanians are invading Earth. Robin reassures her that it isn't. They first met when Starfire was escaping a Gordanian prison ship as a "prize" for her captors, and the original five Titans teamed up for the first time to fight for her freedom and become a team.
    • The climax of "Nevermore" is Beast Boy and Cyborg fighting the Trigon/Evil Raven in Raven's head to give her a chance to unite all her emotions and defeat her evil doppelganger. In the season four finale, Cyborg, Starfire and Beast Boy Hold the Line and distract the real Trigon so that Robin can find Raven and save her.
    • Raven is utterly terrified when Slade returns in season four and he implies that her friends will be terrified of her, only for them to rally around her when they learn of the prophecy. They then insist she hide out in a safe room they made for her while they Hold the Line against Slade.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Epileptic Trees identifying Red X's Secret Identity as Jason Todd, in light of the appearance of Jason coming Back From the Dead in the comics and in the DC Universe Original Animated Movies as the Red Hood.
    • Más Y Menos' slogan, "Si, podremos!" ("Yes, we can!")
    • In "Deception", Beast Boy sarcastically asks about dressing Cyborg like a washing machine for an undercover mission. Guess what Cyborg's stealth mode in Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham was?
    • In "Forces of Nature", Beast Boy plans to prank Cyborg in retaliation for "put red dye in my shampoo". In the New 52, Beast Boy's skin color was actually changed from green to red for a time.
    • In an early episode of Season One, Beast Boy and Cyborg win Raven a giant stuffed chicken, which she snarks about and later abandons at the first sign of trouble. In Season Five, it turns out she's allergic to the bird.
  • Idiot Plot: The main conflict of "Car Trouble" could've potentially been avoided entirely if Gadgeteer Genius Cyborg put more anti-theft measures into his high-tech Cool Car beyond a simple club lock.
  • Inferred Holocaust: The opening to "Aftershock Part II" has a still-frame of Terra using her powers to conquer the city, with civilians running and screaming. The city looks like a war-zone by the time she's through, and Slade later says that Terra has done "some unforgivable things". It's never stated outright, but Terra most likely killed a bunch of people at Slade's behest that day.
  • Iron Woobie:
    • Cyborg, almost literally.
    • Red Star, too.
  • Love to Hate: What most fans love about this version of Slade is how utterly cool he is at being evil, this being the most depraved iteration of the character ever. Here, he is completely stripped down of his Noble Demon qualities from the comics, successfully avoids being an Anticlimax Boss even after he's defeated and, after his return from the dead, he became even more depraved, to the delight of his fanbase. Basically, the more evil he gets, the more popularity he gains.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Red X is a self-proclaimed thief who steals Robin's selfsame suit, then tracks down a Xenothium scanner while the Titans are hot on his trail. Cornered, X uses his knowledge of his surroundings and mastery of gadgetry, taking on the team one-by-one while he makes his way to the Xenothium Ore vault to recharge his suit and uses Robin as a decoy to slip by the security drone. Teaming up with Robin to stop the treacherous Professor Chang, X not only saves Robin but also gracefully accepts defeat when Robin reveals he stole X's utility belt. In "Revved Up", X races against Robin and many of his enemies, demonstrating his skill on a motorbike and, when saved by Robin from an explosion, repays the debt by dismantling all of the villainous racers in under a minute. Stylish and roguish yet noble, Red X cements himself as a memorable character that's neither villain or hero — just as he'd like.
    • Madame Rouge, from Season 5, is the most dreaded member of the Brotherhood of Evil's inner circle. With a fearsome reputation to match her suave voice and lofty ego, Rouge is tasked by the Brain to retrieve a Titans Communicator so they can predict their every move. Impersonating the likeness of Robin to confuse and shake Hot Spot's trust in the Teen Titans, Madame Rouge masterfully plays the immediate situation to her advantage, successfully fooling both the real Robin and Hot Spot to gain a communicator. When offered Kid Flash by the H.I.V.E. Five, Madame Rouge quickly overpowers the then-untouchable speedster with clever use of her versatile shapeshifting. In the season's climax, Rouge, ever confident in her own abilities, manages to fight off several of the Titans before being taken down by Hot Spot, Wildebeest and Jinx.
  • Memetic Molester: Slade is commonly seen as an Ephebophile by fans - for both boys and girls.
  • Memetic Mutation:
  • Misaimed Fandom: Terra. Some see her as an irredeemable psycho while others see her as a blameless martyr. Seriously, is the fact that she's a morally gray character that hard to accept?
  • Moe:
    • Starfire, hot alien babe and considering her age, is very cute! She also has a kind nature and naivety about Earth culture.
    • Jinx too, especially after her Heel Face Turn.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Slade crossed it in "Apprentice" when he infected Robin's teammates with nanobots that would slowly and painfully kill them from the inside-out unless the Boy Wonder became Slade's apprentice.
      • And if he didn't cross it then, he definitely did in season 2, where he manipulated Terra into turning on the Titans, as well as psychologically and physically abusing her. That's not even mentioning him gleefully mind raping Raven while he was Trigon's dragon in season 4.
    • Malchior convinces Raven to break his curse using a classic sexual predator technique; preying on her despair and loneliness.
    • Blackfire crossed it after trying to kill her own sister in "Betrothed".
  • Nausea Fuel:
    • Starfire eating Silky's cocoon and really liking the taste of it.
    • Kitten and her boyfriend Fang, whose head is a giant spider, making out. Though it does show that, out of all the things that Kitten is, she at least isn't shallow.
    • The ending of the episode "Crash".
  • Opposites Attract: Most of the Fan-Preferred Couples invoke this, especially Beast Boy/Raven.
  • Periphery Demographic: Despite ostensibly being a kids' show, Teen Titans (similar to the DCAU, but not to the same level as the animated continuity) is very popular among teens and adults due to its good action, clever writing and surprisingly mature themes.
  • Replacement Scrappy: Brother Blood in season 3 wasn't nearly as badass and threatening as his predecessor Slade.
  • The Scrappy:
  • Shipping: Lots and lots of it.
  • Spiritual Licensee: The series has a tone closer to the Young Justice comics than the comic it was based on thanks to its mix of comedic and dark storylines. It was even pitched as a Young Justice series, which became Hilarious in Hindsight when a Young Justice series was created and ended up being closer in tone to the original Teen Titans comics.
  • Squick:
    • Kitten and Fang's kiss in "Date With Destiny".
    • Starfire's appetite for Silkie's cocoon.
  • Tear Jerker:
    • "Aftershock: Part 2", especially the ending. "You're the best friend I've ever had."
      • Made even worse when you go back and listen to Terra's theme song.
    • "Apprentice: Part 2" is incredibly sad as well. When Starfire has caught up with Robin (who is Slade's apprentice due to blackmail), she threatens him with a starbolt for a while, and eventually we get the following speech:
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Starfire: "Robin... you are my best friend. I cannot be in a world where we must fight. If you are truly evil then go ahead... do what you must."

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  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Immortus has a very cool character concept - that they did nothing with.
    • Blackfire only appeared in two episodes and we never find out why she's so antagonistic in the first place!
    • Classic Teen Titans villain Psimon makes a couple of cameo appearances in the last few episodes. Anyone familiar with the Teen Titans comics, or the Young Justice TV show, knows that this is WAY too cool and dangerous of a villain to be left to a mere cameo.
    • Kyd Wykkyd was one of the most interesting H.I.V.E. students: he's mute, has a Batman-esque costume and odd demon-like powers that are somewhat similar to Raven's. They did jack all with him.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • On a more basic level, Starfire has a deep backstory, yet she never got a season devoted to her own growth the way the other four did (with Robin and Beast Boy getting two in that they tied in to Raven and Terra's growth respectively), while the most growth we got from Starfire was her relationship with Robin.
    • Terra's betrayal (AKA The Judas Contract). In the comics, Terra was part of the team for dozens of issues prior to turning on the Titans. In the show? She had just three appearances prior to the episode in which she betrays them: her debut episode, her joining of the team five episodes later, and a non-speaking cameo in the episode after that. It's believed that this was the result of budgeting issues not allowing for a regular cast of six main characters, but it is still disappointing that Terra having a significant tenure as a Titan is at best implied through only a voiceless cameo and a single flashback.
    • It's never explained why Robin left Batman. While it's implied they had a falling out, "Apprentice" shows (albeit indirectly) that Robin still has a lot of respect for Batman and considers him his father.
  • Tomato Surprise: The season 1 finale had a fight scene between Robin and the other Titans. Robin is being forced by Slade to become his apprentice, and the latter has made him steal something from a tech company. After he beats down his fellow Titans, the camera pulls back to reveal the building was a Wayne Enterprises one, meaning it was owned by his adopted father Bruce Wayne - AKA Batman. Not only did Slade force him to fight his friends, but he also made him steal from and assault employees of his own father, using techniques that he taught him.
  • Tough Act to Follow: While the final season is not considered outright bad, it's still seen as a step down from the extremely well-received fourth season. In particular, the Brotherhood of Evil is rather difficult to take as the serious threat they're positioned as when they're coming off the heels of Trigon.
  • Toy Ship: Beast Boy/Terra. Okay, so they're not kids, but they're still two of the youngest characters in the show.
  • Unfortunate Implications: Subverted on "Troq".
  • Ugly Cute:
    • Silkie might as well be the team mascot.
    • There's also those little egg-headed aliens that worshiped Raven.
    • Monster!Starfire from the episode "Transformation".
    • Blackfire and Glgrdsklechhh's babies in "The New Teen Titans".
  • Villain Decay:
    • Brother Blood. Even though his power level actually seemed to go up with each appearance, his personality became increasingly hammy, petulant and single-mindedly obsessed with Cyborg, which noticeably hurt his overall effectiveness as a villain.
    • Also very observable with the H.I.V.E. Five. In their first couple of appearances, they're the Evil Counterparts of the Titans and can fight them evenly (and even beat them without too much trouble if they play their cards right), but as time goes on, they become complete jokes to the point that Jinx, who remained the most competent, decides to cut her losses and defect to the Titans.
  • What Do You Mean It's for Kids?: To an extent. On the whole, the series is pretty kid-friendly, but there are certain episodes that are very dark. "Haunted" stands out in particular, as well as the entire season 4 arc.
  • What Do You Mean It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: Any episode with Mad Mod and "Employee of the Month", where the Villain of the Week was a cube of alien tofu that was stealing cows to fuel his starship and wanted to blow up Earth after he had enough cows.
  • The Woobie: Often Starfire. Beast Boy gets little bits of Woobification throughout the series, but season five really sticks it to the guy, especially when he finds Terra.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Terra and Raven. There are plenty of times where you just want to give them a great big hug. Raven is also an incredibly literal case of the trope name, as the reason for her birth is to let Trigon onto Earth and destroy it, something which eventually happens in the fourth season. Things get better, naturally.
  1. His mother is dead. Doesn't matter which Robin; his mother is dead.