Tropedia

  • Before making a single edit, Tropedia EXPECTS our site policy and manual of style to be followed. Failure to do so may result in deletion of contributions and blocks of users who refuse to learn to do so. Our policies can be reviewed here.
  • All images MUST now have proper attribution, those who neglect to assign at least the "fair use" licensing to an image may have it deleted. All new pages should use the preloadable templates feature on the edit page to add the appropriate basic page markup. Pages that don't do this will be subject to deletion, with or without explanation.
  • All new trope pages will be made with the "Trope Workshop" found on the "Troper Tools" menu and worked on until they have at least three examples. The Trope workshop specific templates can then be removed and it will be regarded as a regular trope page after being moved to the Main namespace. THIS SHOULD BE WORKING NOW, REPORT ANY ISSUES TO Janna2000, SelfCloak or RRabbit42. DON'T MAKE PAGES MANUALLY UNLESS A TEMPLATE IS BROKEN, AND REPORT IT THAT IS THE CASE. PAGES WILL BE DELETED OTHERWISE IF THEY ARE MISSING BASIC MARKUP.

READ MORE

Tropedia
Advertisement
Farm-Fresh balance.pngYMMVTransmit blue.pngRadarWikEd fancyquotes.pngQuotes • (Emoticon happy.pngFunnyHeart.pngHeartwarmingSilk award star gold 3.pngAwesome) • Refridgerator.pngFridgeGroup.pngCharactersScript edit.pngFanfic RecsSkull0.pngNightmare FuelRsz 1rsz 2rsz 1shout-out icon.pngShout OutMagnifier.pngPlotGota icono.pngTear JerkerBug-silk.pngHeadscratchersHelp.pngTriviaWMGFilmRoll-small.pngRecapRainbow.pngHo YayPhoto link.pngImage LinksNyan-Cat-Original.pngMemesHaiku-wide-icon.pngHaikuLaconicLibrary science symbol .svg SourceSetting
Cquote1.svg
"flavaque de viridi stillabant ilice mella." [1]
Ovid, The Metamorphoses, Bk.I:112
Cquote2.svg


The Metamorphoses, completed in 8 AD, is a Narrative Poem by the Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso, better known today as Ovid. The fifteen books of the poem consist of many stories from Greek and Roman mythology.

These stories range from the origin of the world from Chaos to the deification of Caesar and the celebration of Augustus's rule over Rome. Countless tales from mythology are told in between, including the stories of "Apollo and Daphne," "Orpheus and Eurydice," "Baucis and Philemon," "Daedalus and Icarus," et cetera.

The Metamorphoses has served as an enormous influence throughout the ages; today, it remains one of the best classical sources for many myths. Shakespeare, notably, borrowed from or was inspired by various stories in the collection. Romeo and Juliet parallels many aspects of "Pyramus and Thisbe", a myth which also appears as a play within a play in A Midsummer Nights Dream. In Act V of The Tempest, one of Prospero's speeches is strikingly similar to a speech Medea makes in Book VII of The Metamorphoses. Additionally, Titus Andronicus bears various similarities to the story of Philomena, and Lavinia actually points out the passage to tell her father and uncle what had happened to her.

Ovid's Metamorphoses is available online here... (What, can't read the Latin? Kids these days... A.S.Kline's English translation is available here.)

Not to be confused with Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis.


The Metamorphoses provides examples of:

  1. (And golden honey was dripping from a green oak tree.)
Advertisement