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  • Brutus from The Fall Of Julius Caesar legitimately believed that killing off Caesar would be for the best of the Roman Republic. In fact, he was actually reluctant to do it unless there were people besides senators who wanted it done. Unfortunately, he had to do this as well as go to war with what was once his home with the rest of the conspirators.
  • Giovanni da Procida from Verdi's opera I Vespri Siciliani (The Sicilian Vespers). He'll sacrifice anything for the freedom of Sicily (he says so himself), and his actions eventually lead to a Kill'Em All ending.
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